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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. do not vote for any incumbent, period. host: we are two years out from the next election. you say if this thing does not work, star of the campaign not to vote of the incumbents? caller: start it now. start the campaign now. they want to start campaigning earlier and earlier, we as the american people need to send a message now that if you cannot do it, if you cannot do your job, then we do not want you there. host: john in south carolina on the line for democrats. caller: the morning. listen very carefully. some of these people, they are all about money. ever since they are in office, some more against him. if i was the president and they do not do their job, i would come to the american people and say, listen, let's spend enough money to pay ourselves out of debt and start from scratch. all of those jobs will come back from china because the dollar will not be worth. that is what is it is a bout. host: on the front page of "the financial times." we also have a tweet. this is what the senate minority leader said yesterday on the floor after his meeting at the white house. [video
. it was days before the 1960 election and she thought i should see it. so she put me on top of a mailbox on this huge boulevard and i watched as this canyon filled in with people. and this very charismatic young man -- i was hooked. i did not know what he was saying. i did not understand what he was saying. how was not that precocious. and i knew it was very important. it was very exciting. now i know from google what he said and part of what he said was i am not running on a platform that says if you elect me things will be easy. being an american 6 in 1960 is very hazardous but with hope we will decide which path we take. i thought back at those words over the last four years because it was parallel to another young candidate. jesse barry had a very difficult life as she had hoped for the future. and i think about what she would have thought, knowing that that little boy shook on the mailbox would be working for the president and that president would be named barack obama. it is incredible. >> politics was a part of the conversation on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that wa
for us. but it all started about two days before election day. i had this realization that this was a possibility. this could actually happen. i went to the door of rabin's office and said, what if all of these major offices were held by women? this would be historic. we should do any event if it happens. so, as my friends now, my family, i am a self-proclaimed news and political junkie. on election night and had the tv, my laptop, and my i found, i was watching as the results came in. and it was happening. it happened. so yes, there were phone calls, there were e-mails, logistics', food selection, printing, tables, chairs, all the logistics. how this event king together is a question -- what if? what if we could get them. and i am so happy that we have. i am sure all of them will agree that type of vision is what put all of these five women where they are today. that question -- what if? today's event is bigger. it is bigger than political parties, bigger than politics. bigger than the chamber of commerce. today it is history in the making. it is not just a raised gla
to overcome it in this election. i worry about the future. not every candidate will have the particular advantages barack obama that had in his ability to raise money. >> another question from this side? >> there seems to be a growing consensus or perception that, unlike past democratic president, president obama has not left a ideological format of what it means to be a democrat. there is -- there has been a fear that with the party going so big and republicans moving to the right, there could be a battle for the soul of the party in the next four or eight years. do you see a post-obama age -- a civil war-like occasion happening? >> we just pushed the post-obama age off by four years. [laughter] >> i know. even in the next four years? >> what this president stands for -- i talked earlier about the fight we had. i was reading a book some of you may have read that was excellent about clarence darrow. he talked about some of the fights in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. during the gilded age and the progressive era. so much of the dialogue -- there were differences, but the fundam
telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff negotiations have gone through the holidays, it certainly is perhaps a little bit more of a bully pulpit for the president and for his position on taxes. but i think the biggest story of the year came at the end of the year in the past week or so which is the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown and i think the presidency now might be shaped by those events and those are the stories that both barnicle and andrea have chose n as the top story. would you agree this could be a signature for the second term? >> i to do. i do agree with that. i think the events of a few days ago in newtown, connecticut, will help shape a good portion of the president's second and final term in office. i think it gives us a huge impe it tus to changes in this country that had had taken too long to take hold. i think the presidency itself, i think the man himself was shaped and altered
shortly after the november presidential election. this is an hour and half. >> one of the best things about sitting across from you is that, for all of us who have been part of the institute's staff, we are wondering what you been thinking, with this experience has been like for you over the last year-and-a-half, two years. so tonight, we get to hear for the first time your reaction to the campaign. >> thank you very much. i want to thank the in boyer for the support the university has given the institute politics, including making it possible for us to hire such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of arou
. >> we can now definitively say that president barack obama will be re-elected, mitt romney will come up a loser in this race. >> jon: the billing media story of the year, the presidential election. that was how it ended. barack obama beating mitt romney and an end to a bitter season that started early with the g.o.p. primaries and events like this. >> we saw some of this black church in south carolina where a woman asked you why you referred a president obama as the food stamp president. it sounds as if you are suitcase to go belittle people. >> first of all, juan, the fact is that more people have been put on food stamps by barack obama than any president in american history. [ cheers and applause ] >> i know among the political kli correct and i'm supposed to you use facts that are uncomfortable. [ laughter ] >> so that was just part of a long and memorable primary season. juan, is that your highlight of the year. [ laughter ] >> my highlight? it is telling again for newt gingrich. he in a subsequent debate when we was asked about extramarital life and enough about these questions and
law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before t
united system with a federal election commission that's completely out of control and with other agencies unable to do anything about it. a lot of money coming in in ways that intimidate political actors until the policy process in a very bad way and the way that will only enhance the quality. one example from north carolina riva group ventures who want to influence the state legislature on a bill prepared a bunch of model commercials that destroyed members of the legislature. when a gc comment had nothing to do a type of culture. it basically defined in this child molesting aliens out to destroy the fabric of america and show them the commercials and said if we don't get what we want millions of dollars could be spent on commercials just like this. they got what they wanted to give him money. the idea this is not correct team from anthony kennedy was on a different planet in a different universe than the real world of what we face. so there's all of that to do with the marketing model legislation written basically by a signature is biggest plugged right in. it's the gilded age brought up
the queen, i believe as prime minister t morning after you won the election i believe that you're meeting was slight ackquard that a few things happened that weren't protocol. do you remember what happened. he says well what do they do in the film? so blair used the film that we had made up as a way to answer that question. so it's an extraordinary reversal of things. >> howard and david, so with both shows, with "homeland" now and with "24" in the past, were there actions with various government agencies particularly with terism with yourself and those agencies and did they respond at all to what was going on on in the show? >> no. they really were -- the show is so fundamentally propost rouse, the ood that so much could happen and have a middle and end in 24 shours fundamentally crazy and "homeland" deposit that is the cia is operating on our soil which as far as i know isn't happening. but there is emotional truth to the characters and our relationship with the military and count terism agencies. they were fans. they became fans of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from peop
we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and the question is whether it can support enough growth in the economy. >> paul: taxes are going up, we know that, spending, going up for sure even before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially re
presentation by informing them that his poetry had been dedicated to the president-elect, mr. john finley [laughter] frost had inadvertently stated the name of a scholar from harvard. findlay new frost and may have been a friend of frost. but he was no jack kennedy. [laughter] here's a picture of washington's inauguration the first one in 79 that place in the capitol at the time. the next inaugurations took place in philadelphia and the first one in washington was in 1801. now there is a mess, a legend of the george washington so help me god at the end of the los. but there is no proof that he said that. out of the four words at the time it's come to be a tradition at least from 1933 to the present those words have been added at the end of the los. this is 1929 coming in on the left is the chief justice william howard taft and he is administering the oath of office to the new president herbert hoover. he's the only person ever to be both president and chief justice and you're supposed to say preserve, protect and defend the constitution that he said cruisers, maintain and defend and this
you were happy to do that so close to an election when some might say politically that wasn't the best thing to do. >> this is much more important than any election, piers. this is the livelihood of the people in my state when the president does this evenings that deserve praise, i will give him praise. when the president does things that deserve scorn, i will give him scorn. people know that about me. i am not going to play politics with this issue. this is so much bigger than an election. this is the livelihood of the people of my state. people expect me to get the job done. when they ask me a question, i give an honest answer. how has the president been on this? he's been great. >> this killed ambassador christopher stevens, the country's terrorism chief now says it was a terrorist attack. >> clearly the death of ambassador christopher stevens continues to reverberate and the truth or otherwise of the circumstances leading up to his death seem to be pretty vague to put it mildly. where do you think we are with this? >> well, let me tell you what's not vague and that is five days aft
, no one is coming behind him and senator mcconnell, the republican leader of the senate is up for re-election and as we saw in the senate race in kentucky a few years ago, he may have to worry about a challenge from the right if he supports a tax increase. i think president obama is doing the only sane thing he can, which is reach out to the speaker and he controls the house and, that is -- and the good news for the president is the public seems by all the polls, by the fact the election came out the way it did, to be in his corner, not the speaker's. >> rick: the president -- you want to weigh in on that? >> i just -- >> rick: americans are in favor of raising taxes on the wealthiest americans and, the president did win, november 6th. >> we have seen polls that say that, they approve tax reform and want to see real entitlement reform and want to get spending under control. but, president obama has failed to bring anything up to the -- on the table, and, especially the democrats, they have been silently on entitlement reform and silent on the spending cuts and as we know, we can talk about ra
career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was st
's very clear now, mr. president, that the speaker's number one goal is to get elected speaker on january 3rd. the house is not even here. he's told me he'll give them two days to get back here, 48 hours, not two days, 48 hours. they don't even have enough of the leadership here to meet to talk about it. they've done it with conference calls. people are spread all over this country because the speaker is basically waiting for january 3rd. now, the president campaigned on raising taxes on people making more than $250 thou,000 a year. the bush tax cut will expire at the end of this year. obama was elected with a surplus of about three million votes. he won the election. he campaigned on this issue. again, the speaker can't take yes for an answer. the president has presented to him something that would prevent us from going over the cliff. it was response to something that the speaker gave them himself but i guess with the dysfunctional republican caucus in the house, even the speaker can't tell what they are going to do because he backed off even his own proposal. the house, we hear so ofte
wherever he could. he applied for a job in chicago after washington was elected mayor there. he didn't get anything. so the best he could do was stay in new york. he wouldn't want to go back to honolulu. he didn't have anyplace else. so he stayed there and as he put it, you try to make money for yourself and get a job. it is sort of a magazine or consulting firm called business international. for that year, he doesn't really like it there, but that is the period when they talk a lot. it is the period when he met genevieve. >> host: so david maraniss, going back to the quote, no life could have been the product of randomness like that of barack obama. chicago became a part of that randomness? >> guest: well, the mayoral election in chicago was very attracted to him. and chicago was the place to be at that time. oprah winfrey, michael jordan, the king of the bulls, oprah winfrey had her show, and barack obama who came anonymously. and he is arguably today's most influential. >> host: in chicago community organizer, you quote him. saying that obama was one of the most cautious people i ever m
. for the election of harold washington as the first african-american mayor of chicago was very attractive to him. chicago was the place to be at that point as i right in the book. three people arrived in chicago, michael jordan came during that period, and barack obama came anonymously and arguably today. >> host: jerry gelman, a chicago community organizer, said obama was one of the most cautious people i have ever met in my life. he was not unwilling to take risks but was a strange combination of someone who would have to weigh everything to death and then take a dramatic risk at the end. >> guest: that sounds like president obama too. in some ways that characteristic can be looked at in his life and career. as a community organizer, the whole notion, the method for community organizing was to take action, our does not exist in a vacuum. youpower does not exist in a vacuum. you have to seize it. cameron was one of his bosses during that period, barack was a different story. he was looking for ways to not confront but achieved in other ways. that can be frustrating at times but help him get whe
elections. a morp. >> i'm gonna go with b--prom, final answer. meredith: yes, it is prom. [indistinct] of morp. you got a hundred dollars. let's add a little bit more to that bank. how about $5,000? $5,100, 2 questions away from your "double money" question. this next category, "animal crowds." according to new research, emperor penguins stay warm by huddling together and replicating what common crowd activity? >> oh, my gosh. meredith: stomping feet, hand clapping, crowd surfing, the wave. >> i've been talking about "march of the penguins" all day. meredith: why? >> i have no idea. 'cause i think the worst thing to come back into the world as is an emperor penguin. ha ha! meredith: really? >> yeah. meredith: i didn't know that. >> antarctica's really cold. meredith: oh, 'cause it's cold. yeah, ok. >> ha ha! um... i'm going to have to jump this question. i'm just--i'm caught between 2 answers. meredith: ok, question is out of play. you don't have to answer it. the correct answer-- the wave... >> yeah. meredith: is the right--was that one of the ones you were-- >> i was leaning towards
in the timely topics of a political nature as the election season really showed, they could get the news out in a wider way within the e-book than if they had to wait several months or a year for work. i >> host: i thought michael grunwald new book, the new new deal should've gotten more attention than it did. i found it very and she seen it was not the kind of stuff you are reading the newspapers or magazines or seen discussed in tv. grunwald writes for "time" magazine. he's a nonpartisan and it's an appreciation of what the stimulus not only did good for the economy, but what it means for the environment. it's a story that's gotten lost on the politics. >> host: we have to have your comment as an employee of "usa today." we have to have you comment on u.s.a. tomorrow. guess what i should think sir for her plug for that. the newspaper in september was 30 years old from this little bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world be like 30 years from now, which would leave, what are we talking about, 2042? fare as his little better that than i am. anyway,
be resolved by the election we had a couple of months ago, it's just not working, is it. >> no, it's not. we thought it would be a slow news cycle and certainly that's not happening. stuart: no, no, no, it's not happening. of course in the news business, that's kind of good news, isn't it? carol roth, we appreciate you being with us. thanks indeed, carol. toyota, here is the news, it's going to pay a fine of 1.1 billion dollars. it will settle those lawsuits, remember the scandal? that unintended ak sole ration n some cars that took off on their own. the-- that's actually up. it's a lot of money to pay for a fine, but investors knew it was coming and factored into the stock and maybe some relief it's only, quote, unquote, 1.1 billion. the next question, of 1.1 billion how much did the lawyers get? we'll have a lawyer for you in a few minutes. trial lawyer, mark lanier is here to defend the lawyers fees. hundreds of millions, how about that. and we're about to tumble over the fiscal cliff, and millions of americans face higher taxes if congress does not reach a deal. how much more would you h
roosevelt. my dad thought if roosevelt got elected there would never be another election. >> reporter: a vocal republican in his earlier years, buffett now leans left and is a big obama supporter. >> we were talking about the economy. >> reporter: what else. >> i brought along figures i thought would be of interest to him. this is the presidential medal of freedom. >> reporter: he's never had political ambitions like his father. >> that's my dad's campaign picture when he was 39 years old. this is my dad's desk. this sat on his desk when i was a kid, when i was 10 years old. i always admired it. >> reporter: this is my favorite thing in your office. i need one of those. the too hard box. >> the real problem is if they're in there and i don't realize it. >> reporter: then there are the fun things, like the model mars rover, given to him by students at cal tech. >> thattette bas getting a t-shirt. >> reporter: and the mock "sports illustrated" cover. >> if they ever bring me out it will be as water boy. >> reporter: no fancy flat screen tv, just an old tube. >> no computer. >> reporter:
berlusconi's party with their support setting the stage for new general election in february. ♪ >> gregg: well, look out, from weather, leaving few areas of the country untouched. heavy snow, and strong winds, threatening to make christmas travel a real chore. the nation's airports now looking like waiting rooms. stranded passengers waiting for cancelled flights to be rescheduled and in green bay, wisconsin, home of the packers, buried in snow, so bad, lambeau field is hiring fans to help shovel it away before tomorrow's game. maria molina live in the fox extremes weather center. >> snow storm in the midwest and great lakes and north east and is now exiting the u.s. and pulling into canada amd winding down as far as intensity and snow goes well, have lingering snow showers, in up state new york and portions of vermont and western connecticut and massachusetts. again, overall, the storm system pretty much over and done with, the wind will continue to die down and temperatures, will be chilly behind the storm. midwest, southeast, quiet for today and as we head westbound we still have big t
this elected president. i've written a few pieces before i saw that, so i have some basis of research, particularly on his mother. i think when i get home from this incredible kenyan journey, onto canvas sides of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins interweaving these two incredibly different worlds that helped create this unique person. >> host: who came up this title? >> guest: i did. just bouncing around out of africa and then i said out of africa come out of hawaii come out of kansas come out of indignation at our chicago, out of this world. and so that's what i'm thinking. the book is two things. it's a world that created obama and then how he re-created himself. so i'm not sure if there's proportions yet. it will be important for me to get it right. perhaps even the first half of the book are not quite that much come at the main characters and even on at. and then come in the second half of the book is largely chicago in california, new york and boston thrown in sun. the likes of chi
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)